Mutilate Law and Legal Definition

23/11/2022por Mentores

With respect to public records, mutilation means cutting, tearing, deleting or otherwise altering a document in a manner that alters or destroys its legal effect. It is a federal crime to mutilate public documents, coins or passports. According to criminal law, mutilation is the crime of violent, malicious and intentional injury to a person. “935. The Chamber found that on 7 April 1994, in Rwankeri`s cell, a Tutsi girl named Nyiramburanga had been mutilated by an Interahamwe who cut off her chest and then licked it.” “260. Exhibit 37 of the indictment contains the coroner`s observations on the condition of the sixteen bodies exhumed from the pit latrines. Coroner`s report outlines common features and injuries The report shows that several of the bodies had injuries, but the genitals of the bodies were not mutilated. (b) Any person who intentionally and unlawfully conceals, abducts, mutilates, destroys, falsifies or destroys them shall be liable under this title to a fine or imprisonment for a term not exceeding three years, or both; and loses his position and is barred from performing his duties in the United States. As used in this paragraph, the term “function” does not include the function held by a person as a retired officer of the United States Armed Forces. Cut, tear, delete or modify a document in a manner that alters or destroys its legal effect. It is a federal crime to mutilate public documents, coins or passports. (a) Any person who, intentionally and unlawfully, conceals, abducts, maims, obscures or destroys, or attempts to do so, or carries with him any records, proceedings, maps, books, papers, documents or other things, which are filed with a clerk or official of a court of the United States or a public function, or with a magistrate or official of the United States; is liable, under this Title, to a fine or imprisonment for a term not exceeding three years, or to both. The verb “to mutilate” is defined in the Cambridge International Dictionary of English (1995) as “serious harm, in particular by forcible removal of a part” (p.

933) and in the Oxford Advanced Learners Dictionary (1992) as “to injure, damage or disfigure any person by breaking, tearing or cutting a necessary part” (p. 819). Brief policy briefs on policy challenges in international law. Attorney General v. Juvénal Kajelijeli, Case No ICTR-98-44A-T, judgment (CP), 1 December 2003, paragraph 935: `812. In his statement of 8 December 1997, witness EB referred to the torture and mutilation of Tutsi victims before killing them by driving umbrella poles into their genitals. Applied to written documents such as wills, court records and others, this term means the reproduction of the. It considers that the Commission will be able to present a series of proposals which will have an impact on the requirements of the internal market and will create the conditions for legislation of the Member States as regards the legislation of the Member States and of the Member States as regards the legislation of the Member States and the Member States relating to: the laws of the Member States and the Member States relating to: See Woodfill v. Patton, 76 Ind. 583, 40 Am. Rep. 269.

Im Strafrecht. Deprive a person of the use of one of those limbs that can be useful to him in combat, the loss of which is equivalent to chaos. 1 Bl. Comm. 130. c. inflict grievous bodily harm, including mutilation or damage that limits the victim`s ability to function physically. Originally, in English common law, this meant permanently cutting or paralyzing a part of the body such as an arm, leg, hand or foot. In criminal law, such serious harm becomes “serious” bodily harm, which is a crime punishable by imprisonment. The list in the text is not exhaustive, but is intended only to illustrate the different ways in which this offence is committed.

Mutilation must be understood in the same way as in Article 8(2)(b)(x) and always refers to a physical act of violence such as amputations, injuries to the limbs and sexual mutilation. (cf. Andreas Zimmermann, in: Trefferer, Kommentar zum Römischen Statut des Internationalen Strafgerichtshofs, pp. 273, 216). 46 Consent is not a defence to this crime. The offence prohibits any medical intervention which is not indicated by the state of health of the person concerned and which does not meet generally accepted medical standards which would be applied in similar medical circumstances to persons who are nationals of the party conducting the proceedings and who are in no way deprived of liberty. This footnote applies to Article 8(2)(b)(x-2) for the same element. In criminal law, the crime of violent, malicious and intentional assault and battery of a person. TOAEP has more than 80 Chinese and Indian authors MUTILATION, crim. Law.

Deprive a person of the use of one of those limbs that can be useful to him in combat, the loss of which is equivalent to chaos. 1 Bl. Komm. 130. The ICC Elements of Crimes define mutilation as “particularly permanent” harm. However, this is not formulated as a strict requirement in all cases. Note also that Article 8(2)(b)(x) states that “physical mutilation” specifies that no mental or psychological harm shall constitute mutilation. The concept of mutilation includes any serious bodily harm to a person that causes permanent harm.

(cf. Gerhard Werle, Principles of International Criminal Law, p. 308). More than 530 free and immediately available movies. S.4. Evidence of permanent incapacity for reproductive function. P.3. Evidence of ordinary injuries is not sufficiently mutilated.

Supported by Black`s Law Dictionary, Free 2nd ed., and The Law Dictionary. 3.1.1. Evidence that the perpetrator mutilated one or more persons by permanently distorting the person(s). CILRAP » Case Matrix Network » CMN Knowledge Hub » Collection of evidence » Art. 8 War crimes » Article 8(2)(b) War crimes » Art. 8(2)(b)(x)-1 Dismemberment” 3. The perpetrator mutilated one or more persons, in particular by permanently disfiguring them or by obstructing or permanently removing an organ or appendix.46 Philosophische Grundlagen des Völkerstrafrechts “303. The witness then saw Mika cut off Kabanda`s head with a machete and castrate him.